Resolving a TSA Preliminary Determination of Ineligibility

  • ON Aug 09, 2018
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  • BY Anthony Ison
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  • IN Pilot Law

Are you a transportation worker who needs help resolving a TSA Preliminary Determination of Ineligibility? As an employee or potential employee who might need access to secure areas of the nation’s maritime facilities and vessels, the TSA will require you to have a Transportation Worker Identification Credential (“TWIC”). When applying for a TWIC, the TSA will conduct a background check to determine if you pose a security risk. As a TWIC applicant, you could be determined ineligible due to having a disqualifying criminal offense on your record. If the TSA determines that you have a disqualifying criminal offense on your record, the TSA will send you a Preliminary Determination of Ineligibility letter. This letter will identify the TSA’s rationale for determining your ineligibility for credentialing.

Resolving a  Preliminary Determination of Ineligibility requires timely attention and should be reviewed by your TSA attorney immediately.  Within 60-days of the date on the Preliminary Determination of Ineligibility letter, you or your attorney must provide a response to the TSA. If you need more time than the 60-days, you may be able to request an extension. Nevertheless, within the 60-days, you and your attorney should determine if your case is eligible for either an appeal or a waiver (or both).

Resolving a Preliminary Determination of Ineligibility through an appeal requires the applicant to prove that the TSA erroneously determined your ineligibility. An erroneous determination of ineligibility occurs when 1) you were not convicted of the offense(s) listed in the letter from TSA because the charge(s) was dismissed, nolle prossed, or you were found not guilty; or (2) you were convicted of a misdemeanor(s) only; or (3) you were convicted of simple drug possession; or  (4) the charge is an interim disqualifying felony as listed on the TSA website and the conviction date is over 7 years ago and you were released from incarceration over 5 years ago.

Resolving a Preliminary Determination of Ineligibility through a waiver requires you to prove that despite having been convicted of an interim disqualifying felony within the past 7 years or your having been released from incarceration within the past 5 years, or you were convicted of a permanently disqualifying felony at any time, the you do not pose a terror risk. Fortunately, most waivers will be granted by the TSA, so you and your attorney should carefully consider this option.

If you have any questions about resolving a Preliminary Determination of Ineligibility through appeal or waiver, call your TSA attorney at The Ison Law Firm. The TSA attorney is standing by to help and answer any questions you may have.

  

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